The New Yorker, go figure, has a story about a new innovation from Driscoll’s - “the company that introduced the plastic clamshell to fruit and defined the strawberry in our minds as wasp-waisted, full-chested, and lipstick red - is a rosé strawberry, ‘the least red berry,’ the company says, it’s ever released to the American market. Rosé berries are a ‘limited edition,’ scant and seasonal, available only June through September, and twice as expensive as the regular Driscoll’s berry, something special for the special few.”

But this new product only distracts from a disturbing reality: “The strawberry industry is shrinking, with fewer fields under cultivation and the cost of hiring pickers for the back-wrecking job of stooping over rows increasing … But the real changes have come from … the angered weather gods. The foggy coastal environment where strawberries thrive is undergoing drastic environmental change, with hotter summers and more saline soils.”

Climate change strikes again, and you can read about it here.